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Posts Tagged ‘mui choy kau yoke’

Classic Seremban ‘siew pao’ uses BBQ pork or chicken, green peas and onion as fillings, but this time I used ‘mui choy kau yoke‘ (braised pork belly with preserved vegetables) instead as I had some leftovers in my fridge. I just cut the meat into smaller pieces and thicken the sauce to the gluey stage (to prevent the sauce from oozing out during baking). The result was very good. The pleating part was challenging but fun. I had some pao’s sealed up pretty good but some opened up on the top. The taste of the ‘mui choy kau yoke‘ matches very well with the flaky layered pastry.

Fresh from the oven-- 'Mui Choy Kau Yoke Siew Pao'

Fresh from the oven-- 'Mui Choy Kau Yoke Siew Pao'

‘Mui Choy Kau Yoke Siew Pao’ Recipe (makes 18 pieces)

Ingredients:

for filling:
‘mui choy kau yoke— cut meat into smaller pieces and use cornstarch water to thicken the sauce to a gluey stage. Let cool before use.

Water dough (recipe from Jo’s Deli & Bakery):
1 1/2 cup all purpose flour
4 tbsp oil
2 1/2 tbsp sugar
1 tsp honey or maple syrup
120 ml water (slightly more than 1/2 cup)

Oil dough (recipe from Jo’s Deli & Bakery):
3/4 cup all purpose flour
7 tbsp cold shortening– cold shortening makes the dough less sticky

Method:

  1. Prepare water dough: Rub oil with flour until crumbly. Dissolve sugar and honey/syrup in water then add to the flour mixture. Knead the dough until smooth. Cover with plastic wrap and rest for 30 minutes. Divide and shape into 18 small balls. Flatten each ball with palm then roll out to a 2-inch circle.
  2. Prepare oil dough: Rub shortening into flour and slowly form a soft dough. If the dough gets too sticky to handle, chill in the fridge for a few minutes. Divide into 18 pieces and roll into small balls.
  3. Take 1 piece of oil dough to wrap inside 1 piece of water dough and seal well. Be sure to wrap tightly and eliminate any air pocket. Flatten the dough with your palm then roll it out into a long oval thin dough using a rolling pin. Roll the dough up like a Swiss roll.
  4. Turn the dough 90°, flatten it and roll it out thin. Then roll it up like a Swiss roll. Repeat step 3-4 with the remaining water dough and oil dough.
  5. Take 1 piece of pastry dough, pinch the long ends together then flatten it so the dough is roughly round shape. Roll the dough out to a thin 5-inch circle. Scoop in 2 tbsp of filling. Pinch and seal tightly (be sure no air pocket inside, and seal really tight otherwise the filling will leak out during baking).
  6. Brush egg wash on top of the pastries. Bake in preheated 390°F oven for 25-30 minutes until nicely brown on the surface. Apply egg wash half way through baking. Cool on the rack.


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'Mui Choy Kau Yoke' Pao

'Mui Choy Kau Yoke' Pao

If you like ‘mui choy kau yoke‘, try make this steam pao– I promise it won’t disappoint you. The plain pao wrapping balances the rich taste of the filling. I tried ‘mui choy kau yoke‘ with ‘siew pao’ baked pastry version, and it was good… but steamed pao matches the flavor even better!

As far as the pao dough, this is my first attempt and I find it not difficult at all. Just like any other yeast/leavened dough, it just takes some time to rise. Steaming is quick and the pleating part is fun; it’s much easier to pleat leavened dough than the pastry dough for making ‘siew pao’ (pastry dough tends to shrink back and thus requires really good pinching and sealing skills). I used unbleached all-purpose flour so my pao’s are not snow white like those selling at dim sum places, with a pale yellow look on the outside. Anyhow, this experiment boost up my confidence of making steam pao’s. I’m sure I’ll be making steam pao’s more often in the future.

'Mui Choy Kau Yoke' Pao

'Mui Choy Kau Yoke' Pao

‘Mui Choy Kau Yoke’ Pao Recipe (makes 24 pieces, about 3.5″ diameter each)

Ingredients:

for filling:
Mui Choy Kau Yoke— cut the meat into smaller pieces, and add more cornstarch water to thicken the sauce to a gluey stage. Cool completely before use.

for dough:
1/4 cup sugar
1 3/4 cup warm water
3/4 tsp dry yeast
6 cups all-purpose flour
1 tbsp baking powder
2 tbsp shortening

24 parchment paper– cut into 4″x4″

Method:

  1. Dissolve sugar in warm water (use microwave to speed up dissolving if desired). Sprinkle yeast and gently stir a couple of times. Let it stand for 10 minutes until the yeast floats to the top and becomes foamy.
  2. Sift flour and baking powder into a big bowl. Add in shortening and yeast mixture and mix well. Add more water if the dough is too dry; add more flour if the dough is too moist.
  3. Transfer dough onto a work surface and hand knead until smooth– I kneaded for 10-15 minutes.
  4. Place the dough back to the big bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Let the dough rise in a warm place until trippled in bulk.
  5. Gently knead the dough a few time to get rid of air pockets, then roll it into a long log. Divide into 24 equal portion.
  6. For each small dough, first roll it to a round ball then flatten it with your palm. Roll it out to a round circle using a rolling pin (thinner around the edge while thicker dough towards the center). Scoop in about 2 tbsp filling then pleat to seal the opening. Repeat with the remaining dough and filling. Rest pleated pao on parchment paper, and let it rest 10-30 minutes (no more than 30 minutes or the pao might collapse after steaming).
  7. Place rested pao loosely (pao will expand to double size during steaming) on a steamer tray with holes. Steam on high heat over rapid boiling water for 10 minutes. (Always steam pao over boiling water on high heat. otherwise the pao will taste doughy and sticky).

Comparison of size-- before steaming (right) and after steaming (left)

Comparison of size-- before steaming (right) and after steaming (left).

After steaming, the pao is the size of my palm (about 4 inches across).

After steaming, the pao is the size of my palm (about 3.5 inches across).

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Pork belly is one of my favorite part of pork. I know I know… it’s not a healthy choice of meat, so I always pick the lean one with less fat. ‘Mui Choy Kau Yoke’ is one my favorite dish too, it is so good with plain steamed rice! I have always hesitated to make this dish at home because the pork skin has to be fried before steaming– imagine the oil splashing everywhere on the stove or in the oven… and not to mention the chance of triggering smoke detector…

This time however I decided to give it a try. What I did was clean and pat dry the meat, then put them skin down into the wok with little cooking oil, and fry the skin , use a lid from time to time so oil won’t splash everywhere but open the lid to keep eye on the meat so that it won’t be watery.

Pork Belly with Preserved Veggie 'Mui Choy Kau Yoke'

Pork Belly with Preserved Veggie 'Mui Choy Kau Yoke'

Mui Choy Kau Yoke Recipe

Ingredients:
1.5-2 lbs pork belly
3-4 cup mui choy sum (mui choy stems)

Pork marinade:
1/2 tsp five-spice powder
1 tsp chicken bouillon powder
2 dashes of ground white pepper
2 tbsp dark soy sauce

Mui choy sum marinade:
2 clove chopped garlic
5-7 tbsp pack brown sugar
2 tbsp dark soy sauce
1 tbsp cooking oil

Method:

Clean and pat dry the pork with paper towel. Put a pan on high heat and add 1 tbsp of oil. When the pan is hot place the pork skin side down to fry the skin. Cover with lid if necessary. Fry until skin is golden brown (the meat is still raw).

Remove and slice into 1/2 inch thick and 2 inch long. Season with pork marinate for 30 minutes.

Line pork belly(with marinate) at the bottom of a big bowl, steam on high heat for 1 hour. Add water to the steamer if water is drying out.

Meanwhile, soak mui choy in water for 5 minutes so it’s slightly soft. Open up each stem and wash under water 2-3 times to remove sand and dirt. Cut into small pieces. Season with mui choy sum marinate for 30 minutes.

After 1 hour of steaming, arrange mui choy sum (with marinate) on the top of the pork, steam on high heat for another 45 minutes, adding water to the steamer if necessary. If softer mui choy sum is preferred steam for 1 hour. When done steaming, let the pork sit in the steamer for a while for the meat to absorb the flavor– the longer the better.

Before serving, drain the juice from the bowl into a sauce pan, heat up on the stove and thicken with some cornstarch water. Pour the thicken sauce back onto the reheated pork. Serve hot with steam rice.

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