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Posts Tagged ‘Malaysian street food’

Chicken satay, one of my favorite hawker foods in Malaysia, is marinated chicken/beef/pork meat skewed on a bamboo stick and grilled. The meat is flavorful enough, but we like to dip it in satay sauce. In Malaysia, if you go to eat satays, the vendor will bring up a batch of freshly grilled satays, individual satay sauce for each person, and condiments– chopped pieces of cucumber, pineapples, onion and let’s not forget the ketupat (rice cubes)! You can eat as much or as little as you’d like because only the eaten ones count towards your bill– when you are ready to pay, the vendor will collect and count all the empty skewers and tell you the total price. I remember when I was little, the satay costed RM0.10 for each skewer and the condiments (except ketupat) were free, but not anymore…

Malaysian Chicken Satays, served with satay sauce, cucumbers and ketupat (rice cubes)

Malaysian Chicken Satays, served with satay sauce, cucumbers and ketupat (rice cubes)

Malaysian Chicken Satay Recipe (makes about 100 skewers)

Ingredients:
6 lbs of boneless chicken thighs– cut across the grain, to strips of 1 inch width– see note below
about 100 bamboo skewers (10 inch)– rinsed

marinade (blend fine):
5 stalks (about 1 bunch) lemon grass
6 gloves garlic
12 shallots
3 tbsp ground coriander seeds
12 tbsp sugar
2 tbsp soy sauce
1 tbsp salt
1 1/2 tsp turmeric powder
enough oil to facilitate blending

Method:

  1. Marinate chicken meat in the marinade for 24 hours. Skew the meat on bamboo sticks (about the length of 5 inches). Be sure the top end piece of meat is securely skewed or it may fall off during grilling. The skewing is a very time consuming process so extra pair of hands helps! After skewing, chicken satays can be wrapped up and bag in batches, and keep frozen.
  2. When it’s time to grill, turn your grill on high heat. Brush chicken satays with some oil and grilled on high heat, uncovered, until the meat is just cooked. Always keep an eye on the satays because the meat is thin and they cook fast. Serve immediately with satay sauce and condiments (pineapples, cucumber, onion and ketupat).

Regina’s Note:

  • Chicken thighs: I don’t trim off the chicken fat because they give more flavor and prevent the meat from drying during grilling.

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In Malaysia there are lots of “kuih” (cakes sold in small pieces) made with glutinous rice and coconut– “pulut inti” is one of them. People eat it as breakfast, tea time snack or dessert. Traditional pulut inti are glutinous rice with sweetened grated coconut on the top, then wrapped with banana leave to a pyramid shape with a square or rectangle bottom. I cheated by using cling wrap instead of banana leaves :-). Also, some pulut inti sold in Malaysia are bluish in color– this is because people sometimes use blue pea flower to dye the rice. I don’t have such flower here for the coloring, but I do have pandan extract that gives green color. The first time I made these treats, I over mixed pandan extract into the rice, so the rice came out very evenly green. So this time I just slightly mixed in pandan extract, and it turned out very beautiful with that marble look– just like a piece of jade with all kinds of green and shade.

Glutinous Rice Packets with Coconut "Pulut Inti"

Glutinous Rice Packets with Coconut "Pulut Inti"

Pulut Inti Recipe (makes about 38 bite size pieces)

Ingredients:

for Glutinous Rice:
5 cups glutinous rice– soaked for 1 1/2 to 2 hours
1/2 tsp salt
2 cans (5.6 oz/165ml each) coconut milk
2 tbsp water
1/2 tsp green pandan extract (Butterfly brand preferred)

for Coconut topping:
1 pack (4 oz) desiccated coconut
1 cylinder block coconut sugar (“gula Melaka”)– about 3 inch diameter
2 tbsp sugar
1/4 tsp salt
200 ml water

Method:

  1. Prepare glutinous rice: drain the rice, then add salt, coconut milk and water. Mix well. Drizzle in green pandan extract and stir briefly. This is to create a marble look on the rice so don’t over stir it. Lay rice evenly on a deep dish steam tray, steam for 20-30 minute over high heat. Set aside.
  2. Prepare coconut topping: In a small sauce pan dissolve sugars in water, then strain to remove impurities in coconut sugar. Return sugar syrup back to the pot, add in coconut and salt. Cook on low heat until coconut is tender and fragrant, and the liquid is almost dry. Stir to prevent burning at the bottom.
  3. To assemble, line mini muffin molds with small pieces of cling wrap. Put in about 1 tsp of coconut at the bottom of muffin molds, then pack in about 2-3 tbsp of glutinous rice on top of coconut. Wrap up with cling wrap. Invert the packets so the coconut is on the top of the rice.

Regina’s Note:

  • Preparing coconut topping: taste for sweetness. Add in some brown sugar if necessary for sweetness and darker brown color.

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