Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘malaysian food’

This is one of the easily found local breakfast food selling at the Malay street vendors or coffee shops. It is pretty much doughnut made of sweet potato dough coated with crystallized sugar. Because it doesn’t use yeast like American donuts, kuih keria takes a lot less time to make, and it doesn’t taste awfully sweet like American donuts. When I was a kid, these donuts, along with assorted curry puffs and other kuih-muih (assorted Malay cakes), were selling RM0.10 each (about 3 US pennies). Just 1 US dollars will filled your tummy with all kinds of hand made local cakes, be it sweet or savory.

Back to kuih keria, it’s very easy to make, with very few ingredients and steps. One thing though about choosing sweet potato: I prefer yellow-flesh Japanese yam– the flesh is drier and has more flavor. Avoid using the orange-flesh yam because its flesh has more moisture and mushy, requires more flour in making which could make kuih keria taste hard on the texture.

Malaysian Sweet Potato Doughnuts 'Kuih Keria'

Malaysian Sweet Potato Doughnuts ‘Kuih Keria’

Malaysian Sweet Potato Donuts ‘Kuih Keria’ Recipe (makes 20-22 pieces)

Ingredients:
1 lb Japanese sweet potatoes (about 4-5 small ones)
1/2 cup flour
oil for frying

Crystallized sugar coating:
1/2 cup sugar
3-4 tbsp water

Method:

  1. Wash and steam sweet potatoes, skin on, on high heat until cooked and the flesh turns just soft. Peel of skins easily with hands and mash.
  2. Add flour to mashed sweet potatoes, mix and knead to form a dough. The dough should be slightly sticky. Add a little more flour if the dough is too soft or wet (but not too much as it will make kuih keria hard).
  3. Roll the dough to a log on a floured surface. Cut into small pieces and roughly roll into balls (golf ball size), make a hole in the center with a finger (flour hand and finger to avoid dough from sticking). Set kuih keria aside on a lightly floured surface.
  4. Heat up oil in a wok or deep sauce pan until very hot. Carefully drop kuih keria into oil and fry for a few minutes until golden browned, flipping kuih keria half way for even browning. Do not overcrowd the wok/pan with too much kuih keria at a time. Drain on paper towels.
  5. Put sugar and water in a sauce pan, cook on medium heat until sugar becomes clear syrup and thick. Add fried kuih keria and keep stirring until all are well coated and eventually crystallized.
Malaysian Sweet Potato Doughnuts 'Kuih Keria'

Malaysian Sweet Potato Doughnuts ‘Kuih Keria’– the dough should be slightly sticky.

Malaysian Sweet Potato Doughnuts 'Kuih Keria'

Malaysian Sweet Potato Doughnuts ‘Kuih Keria’

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

When I was making otak-otak #3 trial, I thought it was perfect already– until I made this version. I added an egg this time to make the otak-otak , and skipped tapioca starch and used less water. The result: the egg really makes otak-otak very tender. In terms of flavor, texture and color, this #4 trial is REALLY close to what I just had in my hometown in Malaysia over this past summer! And my two boys even can take the spice and start to love otak-otak. They were saying the other they want otak-otak for dinner!:-)

Muar "Otak-Otak" #4 麻坡乌达

Muar “Otak-Otak” #4 麻坡乌达

Muar “Otak-Otak” # 4 麻坡乌达 Recipe (serves 4-6 people)

Ingredients:
1 container (12 oz) fish paste– see note below
1 1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp sugar
3 tbsp water
1 egg
1 small can (164 ml) coconut milk– stir well

Spice paste:
1 clove garlic– minced
1 shallot– minced
6 tbsp oil
3 tbsp sambal or chili paste
2 tbsp curry powder
1/4 tsp turmeric powder

Method:

  1. In a big sauce pan, fry garlic and shallot with 6 tbsp of oil until aromatic. Add in remaining spice paste ingredients. Stir to mix well. Set aside to cool completely.
  2. Add all other ingredients into the sauce pan. Stir to blend well. Pour the mixture into a greased shallow pan, smooth the top. Steam on high heat for 10 minutes. Serve with steam rice.

Regina’s Note:

  • Fish paste: different brand of fish paste does make otak-otak taste differently. I prefer 佳发brand (see picture below)– it is frozen and can be found in Asian grocery stores. I tried 味全brand frozen fish paste, but found it is not good for making otak-otak. (1/31/12 update: I have bought 佳发brand frozen fish paste a couple of times later but they were bad both times, which was disappointing. I now use  港榮 brand fresh lady fish paste (see bottom picture). This brand is available at 99 Ranch Market, under packaged fresh seafood section.
港榮 brand fresh lady fish paste

港榮 brand fresh lady fish paste

Read Full Post »

While I went back to Malaysia and Singapore this summer, I got the chance to stay at my aunt’s house and tasted all the delicious food her maid Lis made (she is a wonderful cook!). One of the food I had over there is curry pork ribs. This dish really changed my mind about pork and curry combination, as I never have the combination before. I asked Lis for the recipe, and here’s my version. The ribs are tender, packed with flavors– it’s not quite curry and not quite rendang, but somewhere between.

Tangy Curry Pork Ribs

Tangy Curry Pork Ribs

Tangy Curry Pork Ribs (serves 6-8 people)

Ingredients:
3 lbs pork spare ribs– cut into pieces
5 slices ginger
water to boil the ribs (water must cover the ribs in the pot)

Spice paste(blend well with enough water):
5 cloves garlic
10 shallots
1 inch ginger
2 inch galangal
1 tsp turmeric powder (optional)
2 buah keras
2 tsp balancan

3 tbsp sambal chili
3 lemon grass– use only the whitish part, crush with a knife handle
2 kiffir lime leaves
7 oz. coconut milk
4-5 cups of pork stock from boiling pork ribs
3-4 tbsp tamarind water (1 tbsp tamarind paste+5 tbsp hot water, mix well)
salt and sugar to taste

Method:

  1. Boil water in a deep pot. Add ginger slices and spare ribs (water must cover the ribs), cover and boil on high heat for 10 minutes. Reduce to medium heat, continue cooking for another 30-40 minutes. Remove the meat and discard any impurities. Keep the stock.
  2. While the pork is boiling, blend spice paste in a blender, adding just enough water to facilitate blending.
  3. Heat a frying pan and add 2 tbsp oil. Fry lemon grass until aromatic, pour in spice paste. Keep stirring until some liquid evaporates and the paste is aromatic.
  4. Add in sambal chili, kiffir lime leaves and coconut milk. Turn heat down to medium and keep stirring, until the sauce thickens and red oil starts to form from the bubbly holes.
  5. Add in the ribs, pork stock and tamarind water, stir to mix well. Cover with a lid, cook until the sauce reduces and the ribs absorb the flavor. Stir every few minutes to prevent burn at the bottom. Add in more pork stock if the sauce dries too fast. Add salt to taste.

Read Full Post »

I got some lobster tails from Safeway when they were selling at $5 each a while back. I used some in making seafood linguine, and here are the leftovers. Originally I wanted to make buttery lobsters in dry style (meaning more like a saute version instead of a gravy version), but I just don’t know what to do with that little can of evaporated milk leftover… so, I decided the very last minutes to pour it all in. The lobsters still taste delicious, but just not the way I want to present. Oh well, there is always next time…

Buttery Lobsters

Buttery Lobsters

Buttery Lobsters Recipe:

Ingredients:
3 lobster tails (about 2-in wide, 6-inch long for each tail)
1 stalk fresh curry leaves– remove stalk and chop the leaves
3 cloves garlic– chopped
4 tbsp butter
2 tsp curry powder– use good one
1 tsp cayenne chili  powder
1/2– 1 tsp salt
2-3 tsp sugar
1 small can (5 fl oz) evaporated milk

Method:

  1. Rinse lobster tails. Cut into bite size pieces, with shell intacted. Pat dry.
  2. Melt butter in a wok over medium heat. Add curry leaves, garlic, curry powder and chili powder. Saute until aromatic. Add in lobster meat. Stir until the shells turns red.
  3. Add in evaporated milk, salt and sugar. Stir until the lobster meat is just cooked. Serve immediately. The extra sauce is very good with steam rice. For a dry version, use only a few tbsp of evaporated milk instead of the whole can.

Regina’s Note:

  • For a dry version of buttery lobsters/prawns: saute all the spice until aromatic, add in lobsters/shrimps. Cook until the seafood is half cooked, add in 1-3  tbsp of milk/evaporated milk, continue cooking until the seafood is just cooked thru.
  • You can also use milk instead of evaporated milk.

Read Full Post »

Chicken satay, one of my favorite hawker foods in Malaysia, is marinated chicken/beef/pork meat skewed on a bamboo stick and grilled. The meat is flavorful enough, but we like to dip it in satay sauce. In Malaysia, if you go to eat satays, the vendor will bring up a batch of freshly grilled satays, individual satay sauce for each person, and condiments– chopped pieces of cucumber, pineapples, onion and let’s not forget the ketupat (rice cubes)! You can eat as much or as little as you’d like because only the eaten ones count towards your bill– when you are ready to pay, the vendor will collect and count all the empty skewers and tell you the total price. I remember when I was little, the satay costed RM0.10 for each skewer and the condiments (except ketupat) were free, but not anymore…

Malaysian Chicken Satays, served with satay sauce, cucumbers and ketupat (rice cubes)

Malaysian Chicken Satays, served with satay sauce, cucumbers and ketupat (rice cubes)

Malaysian Chicken Satay Recipe (makes about 100 skewers)

Ingredients:
6 lbs of boneless chicken thighs– cut across the grain, to strips of 1 inch width– see note below
about 100 bamboo skewers (10 inch)– rinsed

marinade (blend fine):
5 stalks (about 1 bunch) lemon grass
6 gloves garlic
12 shallots
3 tbsp ground coriander seeds
12 tbsp sugar
2 tbsp soy sauce
1 tbsp salt
1 1/2 tsp turmeric powder
enough oil to facilitate blending

Method:

  1. Marinate chicken meat in the marinade for 24 hours. Skew the meat on bamboo sticks (about the length of 5 inches). Be sure the top end piece of meat is securely skewed or it may fall off during grilling. The skewing is a very time consuming process so extra pair of hands helps! After skewing, chicken satays can be wrapped up and bag in batches, and keep frozen.
  2. When it’s time to grill, turn your grill on high heat. Brush chicken satays with some oil and grilled on high heat, uncovered, until the meat is just cooked. Always keep an eye on the satays because the meat is thin and they cook fast. Serve immediately with satay sauce and condiments (pineapples, cucumber, onion and ketupat).

Regina’s Note:

  • Chicken thighs: I don’t trim off the chicken fat because they give more flavor and prevent the meat from drying during grilling.

Read Full Post »

This is one of my favorite baked buns in Malaysia. Otak-otak is a steamed spicy fish paste and is a very popular food in Malaysia. In my hometown Muar, Malaysia, there’s is a bakery that sells very good otak-otak buns. You have to be there early to buy these delicious buns as they sold out fast. I am glad that I finally know how to make otak-otak, so I can have these spicy buns fresh out from my oven any time. 🙂

Otak-Otak Buns 乌打面包

Otak-Otak Buns 乌打面包

Otak-Otak Buns 乌打面包

Otak-Otak Buns 乌打面包

Otak-Otak Buns Recipe 乌达面包 (makes 18 small buns)

Ingredients:
Dough:
2 cups bread flour
1 1/2 tbsp dry whole milk powder
1/2 tsp salt
3 1/2 tbsp sugar
1 1/2 tsp dry yeast
125 ml water
1 egg
2 1/2 tbsp butter

Filling:
18 pieces of otak-otak (2 inch x 1 inch each piece, 1/4 inch thickness)– see picture below

1 beaten egg for egg wash

Method:

  1. In the mixing bowl mix well the first 5 ingredients then add in egg. With dough hook attached and starts kneading, slowing add water to form a dough. Add a little more water if necessary. Drop in butter and continue to knead the dough until it doesn’t stick to the bowl and pass the “membrane” test. (pull a small piece of the dough, use two hand to stretch the dough to a very thin layer– if the layer doesn’t tear then the dough is ready to proof. Otherwise, continue kneading until it passes the test).
  2. Transfer the dough to a big bowl. Wrap the bowl and leave it on a warm spot to rest/proof until double in size.  (To speed up the resting time a little you can sit the bowl on a moist hot towel, or sit the bowl on top of a pot of hot water).
  3. Lightly knead the dough a few times to punch out big air pockets trapped inside. Divide into 18 portions. Roll out each dough and put a piece of otak-otak in the middle. Bring the dough on two opposite ends towards the center, pinch to seal.Place the buns, sealed side down, on greased/nonstick baking sheet, cover and rest for 45 minutes — 1 hour.
  4. Apply egg wash on top of the buns, bake at preheated 350°F oven for 15-17 minutes. Cool on the rack.
Home made otak-otak

Home made otak-otak

Read Full Post »

I remember one evening over 8 years ago, I cooked curry chicken for dinner. But right after cooking I just didn’t have the appetite for it at all, and even had a little nausea. I didn’t know what had happened, until a month later I found out I was pregnant with our first child Alexander. I stayed away from this food during that pregnancy. Even after I gave birth to Alexander, there was a period of time I was hesitated to eat curry chicken again. Thank goodness the fear went away!

Curry Chicken

Curry Chicken

Malaysian Curry Chicken Recipe (serves 8-10 people)

Ingredients:
8 chicken thighs– cut each thigh into 3 pieces
8 chicken legs– cut each leg in half
4 tbsp meat curry powder
2 tbsp salt
1.5 lbs potatoes
2 cloves garlic– chop finely
2 small cans (165 ml/5.6 fl oz each) of coconut milk– stir well
salt to taste

for curry sauce (for 3-4 serving, can be prepared ahead and kept frozen):
1 pack “A1 Best Globe” brand curry paste
1 big can (400 ml/13.5 fl oz) of coconut milk– stir well
3 buah keras– chop very finely
2 stalks fresh curry leaves
2 tbsp sambal chili

Method:

  1. Prepare curry sauce: Heat up 3 tbsp oil in a frying pan over high heat. Saute buah keras and curry leaves briefly until aromatic. Add in curry paste and sambal chili, stir for a few minutes. Pour in coconut milk and turn down to medium heat. Stir constantly to prevent burning at the bottom. Cook until the sauce bubbles with red oil sipping out from the bubbles (I call it “volcano eruption” :-)). At this point the sauce should be aromatic. Continue stirring curry sauce for a couple of minutes. The consistency of the sauce will look like oily mud (I call it “lava” :-)– see picture below). Set aside. The sauce can be prepared ahead and kept frozen in batches.
  2. Clean chicken pieces and rinse well. Rub chicken with 2 tbsp of salt and curry powder. Season for 30 minutes. Meanwhile, peel potatoes and cut into big chunks. Soak potatoes in lightly salted water to prevent browning. Drain when ready to cook.
  3. Heat up 3 tbsp oil in a wok over high heat. Add potatoes and stir for a few minutes (potatoes are partially cooked). Dish out but maintain high heat. Add in 2 tbsp oil and saute garlic briefly. Add in chicken pieces, stir constantly until there’s no more blood coming out from the bones. Pour in coconut milk, potatoes and 3 tbsp of curry sauce, cook until chicken are cooked and potatoes are soft, stir occasionally. When these is little liquid, add in more curry sauce (adjust to personal preference) and salt to taste. The sauce should be of thick consistency. Serve with steam rice.

Regina’s Note:

  • If there’s still lots of liquid in the wok when chicken are cooked and potatoes are soft, remove chicken pieces and potatoes then cook down the liquid a little more, so chicken and potatoes are not overcooked. However, if there’s too dry then add in some hot water.
  • Always to stir constantly especially when the sauce thicken, to prevent burning at the bottom of the wok.
  • A slightly thinner curry sauce is always good for dipping bread.
Making curry chicken :-)

Making curry chicken 🙂

Curry sauce

Curry sauce

Making curry chicken :-)

Making curry chicken 🙂

 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »