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Posts Tagged ‘chinese snack’

Malaysian style pork jerky, or locally called ‘Bak Kwa’ is different from American version– well, it’s mostly made of pork, usually sweet, tender and moist. Taiwanese version of jerk, although flavor is closer, is different too as it is mostly made of beef, and it lacks the typical ‘shine’ that you’ll find in Malaysian style. In Malaysia and Singapore, ‘Bak Kwa’ is an luxurious snack due to its expensive price, making it a popular gift for friends and family on special occasion like Chinese New Year. I remember eating ‘Bak Kwa’ sandwich with plain white bread on rare occasions… great childhood memories…

Back to making ‘Bak Kwa’, there are many recipes online and I tried at least a couple different versions before, but none tasted quite like the way I had it from ‘Bak Kwa’ specialty stores in Malaysia. Then I started thinking~ Bak Kwa sellers must keep the ingredients simple in order to cut down the cost… so the recipe I look for should have simple ingredients rather than a long list of all kinds of sauces and spices (as I tried before)… thus I chose this recipe “Homemade Bak Kwa (Chinese Pork Jerky)” from MyKitchen101en.com. I did make some modifications to the ingredient list to play around. The results is quite good especially the flavor. Although the look is not as pretty as I expected but that’s probably because no red coloring was used.

With the Year of Pig at our doorsteps, I’m done trying out recipes for CNY snacks (for now!). Now I’m shifting focus to Chinese New Year Eve reunion dinner menu– it’s the feast of the year in my family. I can’t wait for the lunar new year to start, so I can finally lay back and relax, while enjoying the fruits of love of all the hard work I put in. May the Year of Pig bring you abundance of health, wealth and joy. Huat Ah!!

Malaysian Style Honey Pork Jerky 'Bak Kwa' 蜜汁猪肉乾

Malaysian Style Honey Pork Jerky ‘Bak Kwa’ 蜜汁猪肉乾

Malaysian Style Honey Pork Jerky 'Bak Kwa' 蜜汁猪肉乾

Malaysian Style Honey Pork Jerky ‘Bak Kwa’ 蜜汁猪肉乾

Malaysian Style Honey Pork Jerky ‘Bak Kwa’ 蜜汁猪肉乾

Ingredients:

1 lb ground pork– see note below
1/2 cup sugar
1 tbsp soy sauce
1/2 tsp oyster sauce
1 tsp fish sauce
1 tsp Chinese rice cooking wine

Coating (microwave for a 5 seconds then mix well):
2 tbsp honey
1/2 tbsp water

Method:

  1. Combine all ingredients in a bowl. Stir in same circular direction until the meat becomes sticky. Alternatively, use a stand mixer with paddle attached, mix on medium high speed for a few minutes until the meat gets sticky. Cover and chill overnight in the refrigerator.
  2. Lined two large baking pans with parchment paper. Place half of the meat in the center. Cover with a large sheet of plastic wrap, then roll out to 3mm thickness. Repeat with the remaining meat.
  3. Remove plastic wrap, bake in preheated 325F oven for 12 minutes. The meat meat will shrink and there will be some liquid drawn out. Let the pork jerky cool slightly while it absorbs back some liquid. Brush with honey water and cut into big pieces (for easier handling during charring on the grill)
  4. Transfer pork jerky to grill to char slightly. Cut into desired size. Cool completely before storing in container.

Regina’s Note:

  • Ground pork: If the meat is too lean the pork jerky will be dry in texture. I like to use 80(lean)/20 (fat). Also, mix some coarse ground pork with regular ground pork for better texture.
  • I found out my honey water was a bit too thick and thus the jerky was a bit too sweet. Next time revise honey water to 1:1. Or skip honey water for the classic original flavor.
  • My jerky was a bit thin for my liking. Next time just use one large tray instead of two trays.
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My neighbor Auntie Wang gave me this recipe, and it turns out to be my favorite recipe for oil dough/water dough pastry because the dough is very soft and so easy to work with. I don’t know about you, but I always have problem rolling up the dough (after oil dough was wrapped in water dough), and also hates it when I put in fillings and try to pinch to seal tight– many times the dough just keep shrinking back, and the edges keep opening up… argh!! frustrations!!

With this recipe, I NEVER have the dough problem. Because the water dough was so soft, it was so easy to work on on every step– wrapping oil dough, rolling, sealing the edges tight. It really helps making this long pastry process a lot less painful, especially if you are making 2-3 dozens pastries at one time. Another I like about this recipe: it uses cooking oil which is much healthier than shortening or lard.

Auntie Wang’s Pastry Recipe (makes 24 pieces)

Ingredients:

for oil dough:
2 1/2 cup cake flour
about 2/3 cup oil

for water dough:
3 cup all purpose flour
3 tbsp sugar
pinch of salt– optional
3/4 cup water
3/4 cup oil

Method:

  1. Prepare oil dough: Mix cake flour and oil in a bowl to form a dough (do not knead), until the dough doesn’t stick to the bowl. Wrap it up with a plastic wrap and set aside. Use the same to prepare water dough.
  2. Prepare water dough: Mix water and oil to blend well. Combine flour, sugar and salt in the bowl. Gradually pour in water/oil mixture to the flour. Use fingers to combine to form a dough, until the dough doesn’t stick to the bowl. The dough will be very soft. Add more water/oil mixture (equal part in each) or flour if necessary. Transfer dough to a flat surface, knead for a couple of times (do not over knead).
  3. Divide oil dough into 12 pieces, and water dough into 12 pieces as well. Roll each piece into a ball. Take a piece of water dough, flatten with your palm. Wrap in a piece of oil dough (avoid air pocket between two pieces of dough). Pinch to seal tight. With the sealed side facing up, flatten the dough with your palm again.
  4. Use a rolling pin, roll the dough out (away from your body) to a thin long oval shape. Then roll it up like a jelly roll using your fingers (the dough will be “laying on the side”, looks like ” = “). Turn the dough 90 degree (the dough will be in “standing” position, looks like ” || “). With the end side facing up, roll it out to a thin long oval shape then roll up like a jelly roll again. Repeat this process with the remaining water dough and oil dough.
  5. Take a piece of dough, make a cut in the middle on the long side of the dough. With the cut side facing up, flatten each piece with you palm, then roll out to a thin circle, for a total of 24 thin pieces of dough. Be sure the dough center is thicker than the edges. Flip the dough over (so the cut side faces down– this will be the outside of the pastry), scoop in 2 heap tablespoons of shredded daikon filling. Pleat (or pinch) and  then twist tightly to seal the edge. Slightly shape into a ball or oval. You should see the thin layering on the surface. Repeat with the remaining dough and filling.
  6. Place pastry on a baking pan lined with parchment paper (sealed side facing down), bake at preheated 375°F oven for 30 minutes or until light golden brown. Cool on rack. Alternatively, unbaked pastries can be kept frozen. When it’s ready to bake, defrost pastries 30 minutes or 1 hour before baking. Adjust baking time accordingly (after 30 minutes, check every 10 minutes for golden color). It’s okay if the pastries appear wet while defrosting, it will dry out during baking.

Shredded Daikon Filling (can be prepared ahead):

Ingredients:
6 lbs daikon– shredded
3 tbsp dried shrimps– soaked to soften slightly, then chopped
3 cloves garlic– chopped
1 tbsp sugar
1 tbsp soy sauce
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp chicken bouillon powder
1/2 tsp ground white pepper

Method:

  1. In a big bowl, rub in some salt (about 1-2 tbsp) to daikon. Set aside to let it soften and for the liquid to draw out. Then squeeze out as much liquid as possible. Set aside.
  2. Heat up 2 tbsp of oil in a wok on high heat. Saute garlic and dried shrimps until aromatic. Add in daikon and cook until the flavor comes out. Add seasoning to taste (adjust amount of salt accordingly as daikon tastes slightly salty already). Continue cooking until shredded daikon shrinks and look dry.

Regina’s Note:

  • Guideline for buying daikon: About 6 lbs fresh daikon yields fillings for 20-24 pieces pastries. Buy daikon when it’s in season to avoid bitter daikon or old daikon that is hollow in the center. Always choose daikon that feels heavy when you hold it in your hand.
  • Daikon fillings can be prepared ahead of time, and it should taste slightly peppery and hint of sweetness. I sometimes add in some home made XO sauce for a spicy version.
  • When wrapping oil dough into water dough, take care not to trap in any air pockets. Otherwise you might have problem when rolling out and rolling up the dough, as the air might poke through the dough and cause oil dough to leak out.
  • Unbaked pastries can be made and kept frozen. Defrost unbaked pastries in room temperature for 30 minutes– 1 hour, depending on temperature. Adjust baking time accordingly (30 minutes, then check every 10 minutes until pastries turn light golden brown). It’s okay if the pastries appear wet while defrosting, it will dry out during baking.
  • DO NOT apply egg wash– it will seal the layers!
Making stripped pastry dough: wrap in oil dough into water dough.

Making stripped pastry dough: wrap in oil dough into water dough.

Steps for making stripped pastry dough (from left to right)-- (1) wrap oil dough into water dough, pinch to seal tight. (2) flatten dough with hand. (3) roll the dough out to a thin long oval shape. (4) roll it up like a jelly roll.

Steps for making stripped pastry dough (from left to right)– (1) wrap oil dough into water dough, pinch to seal tight. (2) flatten dough with hand. (3) roll the dough out to a thin long oval shape. (4) roll it up like a jelly roll.

Steps for making stripped pastry dough (left to right)-- (5) turn the dough to a "standing" position. (6) roll it out to a thin long oval shape again. (7) roll it up like a jelly roll again.

Steps for making stripped pastry dough (left to right)– (5) turn the dough to a “standing” position. (6) roll it out to a thin long oval shape again. (7) roll it up like a jelly roll again.

Making stripped pastry dough: (8)make a cut in the middle on the long side of the dough. Then flatten with hand, roll out to a disk or oval shape with center thicker than the edges.

Making stripped pastry dough: (8)make a cut in the middle on the long side of the dough. Then flatten with hand, roll out to a disk or oval shape with center thicker than the edges.

 

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My Chinese drawing classmate Jane inspired me to try out this dim sum dish. Why are they called pearl meatballs? This is because after steaming, the rice coating makes the meatballs look like giant pearls from a distant. The first time I made it, the meatballs were gigantic, and way too salty. This time around, they all turned out pretty good. I’m happy with the result, so… time to enjoy my pearls!

Pearl Meatballs 珍珠丸子

Pearl Meatballs 珍珠丸子

Pearl Meatballs 珍珠丸子

Pearl Meatballs 珍珠丸子

Pearl Meatball Recipe 珍珠丸子 (makes about 50 pieces, fish ball size)

Ingredients:
1 1/4 cup glutinous rice– soaked at least 4 hours
1 1/2 lbs ground pork
1 tbsp dried shrimp– minced– see note below
2 cloves garlic– finely chopped
1 egg white

meat seasoning:
1 tbsp salt
1 tsp ground white pepper
1 tbsp cooking wine
1 tbsp sesame oil
1 tbsp tapioca starch
2 tbsp water

Method:

  1. After soaking glutinous rice, drain out as much water as possible. Transfer to a deep dish plate.
  2. In a deep bowl, season the pork with the meat seasoning, then add in remaining ingredients(except egg white) to mix well. Use a pair of chopsticks/wooden spoon/flat rice scooper, stir the meat in a circular motion(same direction), until it binds and turns sticky. Add in egg white and continue stirring motion, until it mixes well and sticky again.
  3. Scoop some ground pork , lightly shape to a small ball of fish ball size or US quarter(25 cents) size. Roll the meatball in the rice so the rice coats the surface, press to stick the rice. Shape it to a ball again if necessary. Repeat until all meat are finished.
  4. Gently transfer coated meatballs to a steam tray with hole (do not place meatballs on a plate–see note below). Steam on high heat for 10 minutes per batch. Do not put too many meatballs in one tray, as there must be room for the steam to come up. Transfer pearl meatballs to a plate. Serve immediately with your favorite dipping sauce (chili sauce, venegar, soy sauce, sweet chili sauce etc..)

Regina’s Note:

  • Optional ingredients: Personally, I would love adding some chopped shrimps, dried mushrooms (soaked to soften of course), water chestnut, green onion for more flavor and texture. However, since my kids are picky about these stuff so I just skip all the goodies 😦
  • Dried shrimps and salt: Since dried shrimps add saltiness to the meat, take care not to add in too much salt– I added too much dried shrimps in my first trial, ended up with pretty salty pearls…
  • Steam tray: In my first trial, I steamed pearl meatballs in a greased metal plate, but because there’s no hole on the plate for the liquid to drain during steaming, the bottom of my pearls were all mushy rice. So, I thought of steaming the pearls directly on the steam tray with holes, this way the liquid can drip back to the boiling water below, keeping the rice from getting mushy.
Pearl Meatballs 珍珠丸子-- before steaming

Pearl Meatballs 珍珠丸子-- before steaming

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I made steamed “kueh”, or dumpling, a long while back using glutinous rice flour but the skin of the kueh turn out too soft. This time around, I got this recipe from my friend and neighbor Angela, as she gave me some steamed kueh and I found her kueh has a slightly chewy skin that I prefer. Needless to say, I quickly asked her for the skin dough recipe.

Things I do differently this time: I placed the kueh on cut-out parchemnt paper, instead of greased cut-out banana leaves– and the kueh don’t stick to the bottom paper at all. Also, I don’t brush kueh skin with oil after steaming. For the filling, you can make anything you want, as long as it is cooked.  I have tried on shredded daikon and jicama, and both times turn out pretty good.

Steamed "Kueh" Dumplings with Shredded Daikon filling

Steamed “Kueh” Dumplings with Shredded Daikon filling

Steamed "Kueh" Dumplings with Shredded Daikon filling. I used banana leave as liners for this batch.

Steamed “Kueh” Dumplings with Shredded Daikon filling. I used banana leave as liners for this batch.

Steamed “Kueh” Dumplings with Shredded Daikon filling (makes about 30 pieces)

Ingredients:

For the skin:
4 cup glutinous rice flour
3/4 cup wheat starch 澄面粉– see picture below
1 1/2 — 2 cup hot water
6 tbsp oil

shredded daikon filling or jicama filling– recipes follow
30 pieces parchment paper (4″ x 4″) or blanched banana leaves

Method:

  1. Mix flour and wheat starch together in a big bowl. Add in hot water and oil to form a dough. Knead the dough until it is smooth. Add more hot water, little at a time, if the dough is too dry. Divide into 20 pieces. Divide filling into 20 portions as well.
  2. Roll out each piece of dough to about 4-inch circle. Spoon in one portion of shredded daikon filling, fold up dough skin and pinch to seal the edge. Place the kueh/dumpling on a piece of parchment paper (sealed side facing up), or lightly greased banana leaves. Repeat with the remaining dough and filling.
  3. Place several kueh/dumplings inside a steamer, and steam on high heat for 8-10 minutes. Be sure not to put too many dumplings in one batch, so there is room for the steam to come up from the water boiling at the bottom.

For shredded daikon filling:

Ingredients:
1.5 lb daikon– peel and shred
4 tbsp dried shrimps– finely chopped
3 cloves garlic– chopped
3 dried mushroom– soak to soften, slice thin
2 stalk green onion– chopped
1 cup hot water

Seasoning:
2 tsp soy sauce
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp sugar
1/4 tsp chicken bouillon powder
1/4 tsp ground white pepper
1/4 tsp sesame oil

Method:

  1. Put shredded daikon in a bowl and pour in generous amount of salt. Toss and squeeze daikon. Set aside for 15-20 minutes so daikon softened and liquid draws out. Rinse daikon a couple times. Squeeze out as much liquid as possible.
  2. Put 3 tbsp of oil into a wok over high heat. When the wok is ready, saute garlic and dried shrimps until aromatic.
  3. Add in mushrooms, saute for a couple of minutes before adding in daikon. Keep stirring until it is aromatic. Add seasoning, adjust to taste.
  4. Stir and cook until daikon softens, adding some hot water, little by little, if necessary to cook daikon further to soften. Put in chopped green onion. Stir a few more times then dish out and cool.

For Jicama Filling:
1.5 lb jicama– peel and cut into thin strips– see note below
2 inch carrot– cut into thin strips
5 dried mushroom– soak to soften, slice thin
3 tbsp dried shrimps– finely chopped
2 cloves garlic– finely chopped
2 stalk green onion– chopped
1 cup hot water

seasoning:
2 tsp soy sauce
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp sugar
1/4 tsp chicken bouillon powder
dashes ground white pepper
1/4 tsp sesame oil

Method:

  1. Put 3 tbsp of oil into a wok over high heat. When the wok is ready, saute garlic and dried shrimps until aromatic.
  2. Add in mushrooms and carrots, saute for a couple of minutes before adding in jicama. Keep stirring until it is aromatic. Add seasoning, adjust to taste.
  3. Stir and cook until jicama turns soft but still taste slightly crunchy, adding some hot water, little by little, if necessary to cook jicama further to soften. Put in chopped green onion, stir a few more times then dish out and cool.

Regina’s Note:

  • Jicama strips: Unlike dough made from flour, glutinous dough is not very elastic– it crumbs and break apart easily. So it’s better to cut jicama to very thin and shorter strips, so the filling won’t poke through the dough.
Wheat Starch

Wheat Starch

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Steamed Taro Cake 芋头糕-- without use of dark soy sauce

Steamed Taro Cake 芋头糕-- without use of dark soy sauce

Steamed Taro Cake 芋头糕-- without use of dark soy sauce

Steamed Taro Cake 芋头糕-- without use of dark soy sauce

This is my family’s version of taro cake 芋头糕. It tastes much better than those store bought bland mushy ones. The secret here is not about the big dried shrimps or big pieces of taro you put in it. The trick is to saute all ingredients until aromatic before adding the flour mixture. I like my taro cake full of flavor so I season it well, especially ground white pepper. The cake is very yummy eaten just by itself, no dipping sauce of any kind is needed. In Malaysia, there is  also a “brown” version of taro cakes if dark soy sauce is used. You can skip the dark soy sauce if you prefer.

Steamed Taro Cake 芋头糕--oh no! I forgot to dress up the cake (garnish)!

Steamed Taro Cake 芋头糕 before garnish-- This one is made using dark soy sauce.

Steamed Taro Cake 芋头糕 Recipe (makes 2 round 11-inch glass pan, cakes are about 2 inches tall)

Ingredients:

Flour mixture:
1 pack (1 lb) rice flour
1 tbsp wheat starch flour 澄面粉 (optional)– see note below
1 1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp ground white pepper
1 tsp dark caramel sauce 黑酱油 (optional)– see note below
4 1/2 cup water
1 tsp cooking oil

2 cloves garlic– finely chopped
2 tbsp dried shrimp– rinsed and roughly chopped
4 medium dried mushrooms– soaked until soft then thinly sliced
3 Chinese sausages (Cantonese style)– chop into small pieces
2 lbs taro– trim off skin and cut into 1cm cubes

Seasoning:
1 1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp ground white pepper
2 tsp dark caramel sauce 黑酱油 (optional)– see note below
1 tsp chicken bouillon powder
1 tbsp fried shallot

Garnish:
Chopped green
Chopped cilantro
Fried shallots
Fresh red pepper (optional)– thinly sliced

Method:

  1. For flour mixture: mix all ingredients to blend well and set aside for at least 30 minutes for the flour to soak up the moisture (put in the fridge overnight if desired).
  2. Heat up a shallow pan/wok with 3 tbsp oil. Saute garlic and dried shrimp until aromatic. Add in mushroom and sausages and taro cubes, continue saute until aromatic and the taro flavor comes out. Add in seasoning and stir to combine well.
  3. Pour in flour mixture (stir mixture again before pouring in) and stir constantly to distribute evenly. Turn down heat to medium and keep stirring until the mixture resembles of thick paste. Remove from heat and scoop the half-cooked mixture into 2 glass pans evenly. Smooth the top.
  4. Steam taro cakes on high heat for 45-50 minutes. If you use 1 steamer and stack 2 trays of cakes on top of each other, be sure to switch the trays half way through steaming. Let the cakes cool slightly (remove any excess water on top of the cake) before sprinkling green onion, cilantro, fried shallots and red pepper on top of the cake.

Regina’s Note:

  • wheat starch flour 澄面粉: Adding wheat starch will make the cake to have a slightly firm texture instead of the normal soft and slightly mushy texture. But, only adding a little is enough or else the taro cake will be too firm.
  • Dark caramel sauce 黑酱油: This is a thick molasses sauce that is black in color. Please not to be confused it with Taiwan style thick soy sauce 酱油膏, as one is sweet and the latter one is salty in flavor. Also, it is different from the Indonesian style dark molasses sauce, as the latter has a much sweeter taste. Skip this ingredient if you can’t find it.
  • This is Malaysian style taro cake 芋头糕, with lots of ground white pepper added and use dark soy sauce. It’s darker and more peppery than the usual Cantonese style.
  • Leftover taro cakes tastes super delicious pan fried with a little oil– crispy on the outside! If desired, add an egg too… you’ll love it!

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'Mui Choy Kau Yoke' Pao

'Mui Choy Kau Yoke' Pao

If you like ‘mui choy kau yoke‘, try make this steam pao– I promise it won’t disappoint you. The plain pao wrapping balances the rich taste of the filling. I tried ‘mui choy kau yoke‘ with ‘siew pao’ baked pastry version, and it was good… but steamed pao matches the flavor even better!

As far as the pao dough, this is my first attempt and I find it not difficult at all. Just like any other yeast/leavened dough, it just takes some time to rise. Steaming is quick and the pleating part is fun; it’s much easier to pleat leavened dough than the pastry dough for making ‘siew pao’ (pastry dough tends to shrink back and thus requires really good pinching and sealing skills). I used unbleached all-purpose flour so my pao’s are not snow white like those selling at dim sum places, with a pale yellow look on the outside. Anyhow, this experiment boost up my confidence of making steam pao’s. I’m sure I’ll be making steam pao’s more often in the future.

'Mui Choy Kau Yoke' Pao

'Mui Choy Kau Yoke' Pao

‘Mui Choy Kau Yoke’ Pao Recipe (makes 24 pieces, about 3.5″ diameter each)

Ingredients:

for filling:
Mui Choy Kau Yoke— cut the meat into smaller pieces, and add more cornstarch water to thicken the sauce to a gluey stage. Cool completely before use.

for dough:
1/4 cup sugar
1 3/4 cup warm water
3/4 tsp dry yeast
6 cups all-purpose flour
1 tbsp baking powder
2 tbsp shortening

24 parchment paper– cut into 4″x4″

Method:

  1. Dissolve sugar in warm water (use microwave to speed up dissolving if desired). Sprinkle yeast and gently stir a couple of times. Let it stand for 10 minutes until the yeast floats to the top and becomes foamy.
  2. Sift flour and baking powder into a big bowl. Add in shortening and yeast mixture and mix well. Add more water if the dough is too dry; add more flour if the dough is too moist.
  3. Transfer dough onto a work surface and hand knead until smooth– I kneaded for 10-15 minutes.
  4. Place the dough back to the big bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Let the dough rise in a warm place until trippled in bulk.
  5. Gently knead the dough a few time to get rid of air pockets, then roll it into a long log. Divide into 24 equal portion.
  6. For each small dough, first roll it to a round ball then flatten it with your palm. Roll it out to a round circle using a rolling pin (thinner around the edge while thicker dough towards the center). Scoop in about 2 tbsp filling then pleat to seal the opening. Repeat with the remaining dough and filling. Rest pleated pao on parchment paper, and let it rest 10-30 minutes (no more than 30 minutes or the pao might collapse after steaming).
  7. Place rested pao loosely (pao will expand to double size during steaming) on a steamer tray with holes. Steam on high heat over rapid boiling water for 10 minutes. (Always steam pao over boiling water on high heat. otherwise the pao will taste doughy and sticky).

Comparison of size-- before steaming (right) and after steaming (left)

Comparison of size-- before steaming (right) and after steaming (left).

After steaming, the pao is the size of my palm (about 4 inches across).

After steaming, the pao is the size of my palm (about 3.5 inches across).

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I saw this recipe posted in Lily’s Wai Sek Hong, where she got it from this Chinese cooking video. The pastries (from Lily and the video) looks so good that I gave it a try. Indeed, it’s very delicious and peppery.

I have never had one before so I don’t know what is the original authentic taste, but I like my version except it’s a little sweet, next time I will cut down the sugar. If you understand Mandarin and some Hockien, check out the video as the cook shares some tips. Also, the cook uses more white pepper and soy sauce paste than the recipe calls for. When making the yeasted dough, the cook mixes yeast with the flour before adding water– I followed this approach but found out that the yeast does not completely dissolve into the dough. I should have dissolve the yeast in the water instead of adding it to the flour.

Peppery Pork Pastry

Peppery Pork Pastry

Peppery Pork Pastry Recipe (makes 10 pieces)

Ingredients:

Filling:
1/2 lb ground pork
1/2 ground pork belly
5 tbsp soy sauce paste
3 tbsp ground white pepper– toast in dry clean wok on low heat until aromatic, let cool
3 tbsp sugar— should cut down to 2 tbsp next time
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp five-spice powder
1 tbsp sesame oil
3 tbsp water

2 cups chopped green onions

Yeasted dough:
2 cups AP flour
1/2 tsp yeast
1/4 tsp salt
3/4 cup water
1 tsp oil

Oil dough:
1/2 cup cake flour
1/2 cup shortening or lard

1/2 cup roasted sesame seeds
1/3 cup brown sugar syrup (dissolve sugar in 1/3 cup water then cool)

Method:

  1. Combine two ground meat. Add in soy sauce paste, white pepper, sugar, salt, five-spice powder, sesame oil and water. Use chopsticks to stir in circular motion until all seasoning combined and the meat is “sticky”. Chill for 2-3 hours or overnight. Then divide into 10 portions.
  2. Prepare yeasted dough: Combine flour and salt. Dissolve yeast in 1/2 cup water then gradually pour into flour mixture. Add in remaining water if dough is too dry, a little at a time. When the dough forms a ball, drizzle in oil and hand knead until smooth and elastic, about 8-10 minutes. Rest dough in a bowl, cover and let it rise until double in size. Knead a few times to push out air pockets. Divide into 10 portions and let it rest for 5 minutes.
  3. Prepare oil dough: Combine shortening with flour and knead to form a dough. Divide into 10 portions.
  4. Roll out 1 piece of yeasted dough, wrap in 1 piece of oil dough tightly to seal. Roll out to a long oval shape, then roll up like a swiss roll. Turn 90° and roll out to a long oval shape and then roll up like a swiss roll again. Repeat with the remaining doughs. Rest the roll up dough for 15 minutes.
  5. Take 1 piece of dough, press index finger in the middle of the dough, then use thumb and middle finger to pinch the two long ends together so the dough is roughly round shape. Roll out to a thin circle. Wrap in 1 portion of ground pork and top with 2-3 tbsp of green onion. Pinch the edge of dough to seal tightly with seal side facing down. Repeat with the remaining doughs and filling.
  6. Dip the top of the wrapped pastries with brown sugar syrup then dip into roasted sesame seeds to cover the top. Place pastries on a greased baking pan and rest for 20-30 minutes. Bake in preheated 350°F oven for 20-30 minutes. Open the oven door slightly after first 10 minutes so the pastries crisp better (thanks to Lily for this tip!). Cool on a rack.

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