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Posts Tagged ‘bangkuang’

Steamed Veggie Buns 'Chye Pao'-- jicama version

Steamed Veggie Buns ‘Chye Pao’– jicama version

Opps! I forgot to take a picture of the pao showing the filling… also, this time my paos have more yellowish tone one the dough. Could it be different batch of flour bought and used?… I wonder if the pao will look more ‘white’ if I use bleached flour?…

Steam Veggie Buns ‘Chye Pao’ (Jicama version) Recipe (makes 28 paos):

Ingredients:

for Dough:

1/4 cup sugar
1 3/4 cup warm water
3/4 tbsp dry yeast
6 cups all-purpose flour
1 tbsp baking powder
2 tbsp shortening

28 parchment paper– cut into 3″x3″

for Filling:
2.5 lbs jicama–remove skin and shredded
8 medium dried mushroom– soaked overnight then finely sliced
1/2 carrot– finely shredded
3 stalks green onion– chopped
2 tbsp dried shrimp– wash and chopped
2 cloves garlic– chopped

Seasoning:
1/2 tbsp soy sauce
1 tbsp ground white pepper
1 tsp chicken bouillon powder
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp sugar
1/3 cup hot water

Method:

  1. Dissolve sugar in warm water (use microwave to speed up dissolving if desired). Sprinkle yeast and gently stir a couple of times. Let it stand for 10 minutes until the yeast floats to the top and becomes foamy.
  2. Sift flour and baking powder into a big bowl. Add in shortening and yeast mixture and mix well. Add more water if the dough is too dry; add more flour if the dough is too moist.
  3. Transfer dough onto a work surface and hand knead until smooth– I kneaded for 10-15 minutes.
  4. Place the dough back to the big bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Let the dough rise in a warm place until tripple in bulk.
  5. While waiting for the dough to rise, cook the filling: Heat up a wok with 2 tbsp oil, saute garlic, dried shrimp until aromatic. Add in mushroom and saute until flavor of mushroom comes out. Put in jicama and carrot, and stir until jicama looks soften. Add in seasoning and half of the water, continue cooking until jicama soften some more and yet still maintain some crunchiness to taste. Add in more water if necessary. Add in chopped green onion. Stir quickly then dish out to cool down.
  6. Back to the dough: gently knead the dough a few time to get rid of air pockets, then roll it into a long log. Divide into 28 equal portion.
  7. For each small dough, first roll it to a round ball then flatten it with your palm. Roll it out to a round circle using a rolling pin (thinner around the edge while thicker dough towards the center). Scoop in about 2 tbsp filling then pleat to seal the opening. Repeat with the remaining dough and filling. Rest pleated pao on parchment paper, and let it rest 10-30 minutes (no more than 30 minutes or the pao might collapse after steaming).
  8. Place rested pao loosely (pao will expand to double size during steaming) on a steamer tray with holes. Steam on high heat over rapid boiling water for 10 minutes. (Always steam pao over boiling water on high heat. otherwise the pao will taste doughy and sticky).
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Poh piah-- fully loaded with goodies

Poh piah-- fully loaded with goodies

I have always love ‘poh piah’ (Chinese version of burrito)– I don’t think I can get tired of eating it. While some people have different filling, the most common and main filling is jicama ‘bangkuang’,  with other side ingredients like bean sprouts, fried tofu, cucumber, eggs, lettuce, pork, fried shallots, granulated peanut etc. These side ingredients not only add color and texture but also deliver flavor. A bite into ‘poh piah’ and you can still taste each ingredient’s unique flavor– that’s why I can eat 4-5 rolls at one time with no problem. As you can see from the ingredients, this is quite a healthy snack food loaded with lots of vegetables and little on meat. Good news to all vegetarian friends: this dish can be completely vegetarian too (just omit the shrimp and pork) and still taste good. Enjoy the pictures! Next time I make it I will write down the recipe to post it on the blog… it’s been a long time and I forgot the ingredient amount…

Poh Piah

Poh Piah

I made this red kidney bean with gula melaka dessert to go with poh piah... yummy!

I made this red kidney bean with gula melaka dessert soup to go with poh piah... yummy!

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Jicama, or bangkuang in Hokkien, is a type of root vegetables that contains lots of water. It has a crunchy texture and slightly sweet to the taste. I bought some jicamas the other day to make “poh piah” (Chinese burrito)– speaking of which, I forgot to take pictures again… Anyhow, I bought too much so this is what I did with the extras– I made bangkuang kueh or commonly known as “soon kueh” in Malaysia.

After steaming: Jicama Dumplings 'Soon Kueh/Bangkuang Kueh'

After steaming: Jicama Dumplings 'Soon Kueh/Bangkuang Kueh'

Pan-fried 'Soon Kueh'-- yum!

Pan-fried 'Soon Kueh'-- yum!

Soon Kueh/Bangkuang Kueh Recipe (skin recipe is from Rose’s Kitchen)– makes 40 pcs:

Skin Ingredients:
2 1/4  cups rice flour
3/4 cup tapioca flour
1/2 tsp salt
2 tbsp oil
600 ml water

Filling Ingredients: cooked jicamas (see below for recipe)

Method:

  1. Sieve rice flour and tapioca flour into a big bowl.
  2. Boil 600ml water with salt. When boiled, pour into the flour mixture and quickly stir with a wooden spoon until all combined and cooked.
  3. Dust board with tapioca flour and transfer the dough onto the floured surface. Add in oil and knead well until smooth, adding more tapioca flour if needed. Rest dough for 10 minutes.
  4. Dip hands with water and knead dough again until smooth and pliable. Divide dough into 40 balls. Cover them to prevent drying.
  5. Roll out each balls thinly. Place in 1 1/2 tbsp of filling, fold in half and seal edges by pinching the sides together. If the edge opens up after you pinch, dip your finger with a little tapioca flour then pinch again.
  6. Place kueh on greased steaming trays, sprinkle with some water and steam over high heat for 10 minutes. When kueh puffs up, it is ready. Remove and brush with oil generously to prevent sticking together.

Jicama Filling

Ingredients:
2 lbs jicama/bangkuang
1 carrot
2-3 tbsp dried shimp (rinsed)
2-3 cloves garlic

Seasoning: my seasoning is based upon estimation or agak-agak. I like mine a bit peppery from ground white pepper and slightly browish color. Adjust the seasoning according to your taste.

  • salt
  • ground white pepper
  • soy sauce
  • sugar (adjust according to the sweetness of jicama)
  • chicken powder

Method:

  1. Peel jicamas and carrot. Cut into thin strips. Chop garlic and dried shrimp, set aside.
  2. Heat oil in wok, saute garlic and dried shrimp until fragrant. Add jicamas and carrot strips, stir fry a while then add seasoning. Continue stir fry until jicamas are soft and ingredients are almost dry. Set aside to cool before wrapping.

Note:

  • Brush soon kueh after steaming so they don’t stick together. If stacking up into layers, place plastic wrap between each layer will also help getting them out.
  • Leftover soon kueh– just pan fry until the skin is golden and crispy, serve with sambal chili and a cup of coffee… shiok!

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